How To Know What Size Wax Ring For Toilet

To determine the correct width for your wax ring, simply turn your toilet bowl on its side, and measure the opening on the bottom of your toilet, called the “elbow neck.” Whatever width this measurement is, use that width wax ring. E.g. if the elbow neck measures 3 inches, use a 3-inch wax ring. via

Is there different size wax rings for toilets?

Wax rings come in two diameters, 3 inches and 4 inches, because — as you might expect — those are the two standard sizes for toilet waste openings. Besides diameter, thickness is also an important parameter when it comes to wax rings. Again, there are two possibilities: regular and extra thick. via

When should you use an extra thick wax ring?

If your flange is floor level or slightly below then you can use an extra-thick wax ring. If the flange is lower than a 1/4” below the floor level then you should use a flange extension to raise the flange height or remove and replace the old floor flange and set it to the right height. via

Can you use 2 wax rings when installing a toilet?

You can certainly install a toilet with multiple wax rings, in fact sometimes it is necessary to make sure you don't have a leak. You can buy an extra-thick wax ring, or you can just buy two rings and stack one on top of the other. via

Should you put the wax ring on the toilet or the flange?

Whenever you remove a toilet for any reason, you will need to replace the wax ring seal between the toilet and the toilet flange (sometimes called a closet flange) attached to the floor. A wax seal is used because it resists mold and bacteria and retains its sealing ability after years of use. via

Should you use 2 wax rings?

Do not be tempted to stack up two wax rings because this setup tends to leak. Installing a flange extender or using an extra-thick wax ring will work much better in the long run. Place the wax ring on the closet flange, not on the toilet. via

How long does wax ring on toilet last?

The wax ring is exactly what it sounds like: a ring made of sticky wax that helps form a watertight seal between the bottom of the toilet and the sewer pipe. It requires no maintenance and can last 30 or more years, often as long as the toilet itself. via

How do I know if my wax ring is sealed?

  • Water stains on the ceiling from the floor below.
  • A lingering, unpleasant bathroom odor from escaped sewer gasses.
  • Wobbling toilet.
  • via

    Is there something better than a wax ring?

    Wax-free toilet seals are made out of a heavy duty rubber, so they're flexible enough to shimmy into the flange without smearing a wax ring. Wax-free seals can also be reused. As long as they're still attached to the bowl in good condition, you can reinstall the toilet without replacing the seal. via

    Should you caulk around the toilet?

    Caulk prevents a fouling area. If mop water, bathtub water, or a less pleasant “bathroom liquid” gets underneath the toilet, there is no way to clean it up. Caulking around the base of the toilet will prevent this from happening. via

    Can plunging a toilet damage the wax ring?

    In an effort to dislodge whatever is clogging the toilet, many homeowners get overzealous and thrust too hard downward into the toilet with their plunger. A hard thrust downward can break the wax seal between the toilet and the floor, causing a leak. And a really hard thrust could even crack the bowl. via

    Why do toilet wax rings fail?

    One very common cause of wax ring problems is loose toilets. If the toilet is not firmly mounted, or gets loose to the point where it rocks a bit, it can cause the wax ring to lose its seal. When installed, a wax ring is compressed to fit the flange and the toilet, creating the seal. via

    Should you tile around or under a toilet?

    The bathroom fitters are unanimous—if you're looking for a high quality finish, with a better seal against water damage, then always tile the floor first. The floor will be sealed a lot better with the tiles being laid under the toilet. 2. It is also easier to do this rather than trying to cut tiles around the toilet. via

    Can a toilet flange be too high?

    When your toilet flange is too high, your toilet may leak water and rock back and forth when used. Both the leaking and the rocking can warp or break the floor. A leaking flange can also rot the subfloor and lead to the accumulation of mildew and mold. via

    Do I need to remove old wax ring?

    If you have to remove your toilet for any reason, you should plan to replace your wax ring. Lifting the toilet will break the seal and if the wax is old, it may not reseal. Sagging or soft spots on the bathroom floor near your toilet could also point to water damage. via

    What dissolves toilet ring wax?

    A rag soaked in mineral spirits will remove toilet wax ring residue quickly. Mineral spirits are an excellent solvent that cut through many types of grime, including wax. Apply mineral spirits to the wax residue and scrub with a rag or cloth to remove it. via

    Why would a toilet need 2 wax rings?

    Bathrooms with ceramic floors sometimes use two flanges to ensure that the toilet is properly seated on top of the floor. This is done mostly when the height of the floor is higher than that of the flange. Some people use an additional flange as a spacer to ensure that the wax ring is secured properly. via

    Can you reuse wax seal toilet?

    Toilet Removal

    The old one cannot be reused. If a toilet needs to be lifted in order to remove an object from the toilet or provide access to a clogged drain, the wax seal will need to be replaced. via

    Why use a jumbo wax ring?

    Toilets with more than normal spacing will need a taller ring to achieve a proper seal. But if you use a tall ring without the flange on a properly spaced toilet installation, excess wax will be squeezed into the drainage path, causing an undesirable obstruction. via

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